BEGIN:VCALENDAR VERSION:2.0 PRODID:-//Department of Art History - ECPv4.8.2//NONSGML v1.0//EN CALSCALE:GREGORIAN METHOD:PUBLISH X-WR-CALNAME:Department of Art History X-ORIGINAL-URL:https://arthistory.wisc.edu X-WR-CALDESC:Events for Department of Art History BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=UTC+0:20191024T170000 DTEND;TZID=UTC+0:20191024T183000 DTSTAMP:20191018T004717 CREATED:20190909T073207Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190913T160029Z UID:1473-1571936400-1571941800@arthistory.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Heghnar Watenpaugh: "The Missing Pages: The Modern Life of a Medieval Manuscript from Genocide to Justice" DESCRIPTION:\nArt history\, histories of genocide\, cultural heritage\, and the questions of the continuity of the medieval and the modern intersect in the biography of a medieval Armenian Gospels manuscript. Eight of its illuminated pages were discovered in the J. Paul Getty Museum in 2010\, prompting a lawsuit. The tale of the separation of the pages from the manuscript tells a story of genocide and survival\, and makes the case for a human right to art. \nBiography:\nDr. Heghnar Zeitlian Watenpaugh specializes in the history of art\, architecture\, and urbanism in the Middle East\, including architectural preservation\, museums\, and cultural heritage. Her first book\, The Image of an Ottoman City: Architecture in Aleppo\, was awarded the Spiro Kostof Book Prize from the Society of Architectural Historians. She has also received the Best Article Award from the Syrian Studies Association\, and the Omer Lutfi Barkan Article Prize from the Ottoman and Turkish Studies Association.  Her second book\, The Missing Pages: The Modern Life of a Medieval Manuscript\, from Genocide to Justice\, was published by Stanford University Press in 2019. Her research has been supported by fellowships from the J. Paul Getty Trust\, National Endowment for the Humanities\, Fulbright-Hays\, Social Science Research Council\, the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art\, and the Office of the President of the University of California. She has served on the boards of the Society of Architectural Historians\, the Syrian Studies Association\, and the Historians of Islamic Art Association\, among other professional organizations. \n\nThis event is possible thanks to the generous financial support of the UW Anonymous Fund. The Center for Visual Cultures would also like to thank the Department of Art History\, the Buildings\, Landscapes\, Cultures Program\, LACIS\, the Middle East Studies Program\, and the Department of Spanish and Portuguese for their support. \n URL:https://arthistory.wisc.edu/event/heghnar-watenpaugh-the-missing-pages-the-modern-life-of-a-medieval-manuscript-from-genocide-to-justice/ LOCATION:Conrad A. Elvehjem Building\, Room L150\, 800 University Avenue\, Madison\, WI\, 53706\, United States CATEGORIES:Public Lecture ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://arthistory.wisc.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/1020/2019/09/9a008182-6d58-4b06-a797-41686d36e0d1.jpg END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191025T150000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191025T170000 DTSTAMP:20191018T004717 CREATED:20191010T031301Z LAST-MODIFIED:20191010T031301Z UID:1603-1572015600-1572022800@arthistory.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Annapurna Mamidipudi: "Telling Color by Smell\, Memory and Song: The Innovation of Traditional Craft in South India" DESCRIPTION:Rethinking Innovation\, Textile and Material Culture\nDr. Annapurna Mamidipudi\n(Deutsches Museum\, Munich\, Germany) \nPublic Lecture: “Telling Color by Smell\, Memory and Song:\nThe Innovation of Traditional Craft in South India” \nAbstract\nCraft producers in India stand in the shadow of deep divisions–rich/poor\, urban/rural\, modern/traditional\, Brahmin/Dalit\, educated scientist/illiterate labour\, and so on. Based on practices of contemporary craftspeople in South India\, this presentation explores the making and maintaining of knowledge claims as opportunity for political action: as a unifying device for cultural cohesion\, as embodied cognition that engages both mind and body\, and as tool for democracy and justice. \nThis event is co-sponsored by Harvey Goldberg Center of History Department\, Center for Design and Material Culture at School of Human Ecology\, Department of Art History \n URL:https://arthistory.wisc.edu/event/annapurna-mamidipudi-telling-color-by-smell-memory-and-song-the-innovation-of-traditional-craft-in-south-india/ LOCATION:Conrad A. Elvehjem Building\, Room L150\, 800 University Avenue\, Madison\, WI\, 53706\, United States CATEGORIES:Public Lecture ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://arthistory.wisc.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/1020/2019/10/Mamidipudi-Talk-poster_small.jpg END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191030T180000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191030T193000 DTSTAMP:20191018T004717 CREATED:20191009T200358Z LAST-MODIFIED:20191009T201453Z UID:1591-1572458400-1572463800@arthistory.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Julie Nelson Davis: "Reconsidering 'Pictures of Beauties' in the Era of #metoo: An Utamaro Case Study" DESCRIPTION:Julie Nelson Davis\, Professor of the History of Art at the University of Pennsylvania\, is a leading scholar of early modern Japanese woodblock prints. \nPresented by the Art History Department with support from Asian Languages and Cultures\, the Center for Visual Cultures\, and the Chazen Museum of Art. \nFunding provided by the University Lectures Committee Anonymous Fund and the Joan B. Mirviss Japanese Art Fund. \n URL:https://arthistory.wisc.edu/event/julie-nelson-davis-reconsidering-pictures-of-beauties-in-the-era-of-metoo-an-utamaro-case-study/ LOCATION:Conrad A. Elvehjem Building\, Room L140\, 800 University Avenue\, Madison\, WI\, 53706\, United States CATEGORIES:Public Lecture ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/png:https://arthistory.wisc.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/1020/2019/10/Picture1.png END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191105T120000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191105T130000 DTSTAMP:20191018T004717 CREATED:20191009T204248Z LAST-MODIFIED:20191009T204248Z UID:1601-1572955200-1572958800@arthistory.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Workshop with Professor Lea Stirling: "Old Data and New Research: Working with Legacy Data\, Archives\, and Old Periodicals in Archaeology and Art History" DESCRIPTION:Researchers in Art History and Archaeology can expect to study old objects\, but they may also find that they need to handle old data: Victorian-era publications\, original excavation notebooks\, or other archival records. These old sources can be tantalizing or frustrating in their brevity or the different expectations of recording (such as an 18-page article in 1903 summarizing the finds from 1200 Roman tombs Sousse\, Tunisia). Outmoded assumptions about gender\, class\, or colonialism may be jarring but provide a good reminder of the intellectual filters through which objects and knowledge pass in reaching us. At the same time\, old sources enrich research because they are the eyewitness account of early discoveries and monuments that often no longer exist. Digitization projects have made much early data more accessible. The researcher must seek information\, consider social context\, and attempt new synthesis to enrich current research. In this workshop\, I use examples from my own research projects to explore the problems and rewards of working with old data. \nPlease RSVP to cvc@mailplus.wisc.edu if you would like to attend the workshop. \nThis workshop will be geared towards graduate students and advanced undergrads. All are welcome! \n URL:https://arthistory.wisc.edu/event/workshop-with-professor-lea-stirling-old-data-and-new-research-working-with-legacy-data-archives-and-old-periodicals-in-archaeology-and-art-history/ LOCATION:University Club\, Room 212\, 432 East Campus Mall CATEGORIES:Workshop ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://arthistory.wisc.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/1020/2019/10/fondation-patrimoine-org.jpg END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=UTC+0:20191105T170000 DTEND;TZID=UTC+0:20191105T183000 DTSTAMP:20191018T004717 CREATED:20190910T065456Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190913T155341Z UID:1477-1572973200-1572978600@arthistory.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Lea Stirling: "Traveling Statuettes and Traveling Aristocrats? Networks of Acquisition in the Statuary Collection at the Late Antique Villa of Séviac (France)" DESCRIPTION:The luxury décor of the Late Roman villa of Séviac (France) includes mosaics and statuary\, including heirlooms\, locally-made elements\, and imported items. Though most surviving fragments of statuary are physically small\, they provide evidence for up to ten marble statues and statuettes\, some of which originated in the East Mediterranean. Moreover\, an exceptional portrait wearing an Eastern-style toga suggests a connection to the imperial court or administration. The statuary collection at Séviac provides an opportunity to examine aristocratic networks of acquisition in Southern Gaul around A.D. 400\, a period when easy connectivity within the Mediterranean world was declining. Personal travel and networks probably account for the imported items at Séviac. \nBiography:\nDr. Lea Stirling is Professor of Classics at the University of Manitoba and held the Canada Research Chair in Roman Archaeology 2002–12. One stream of her research investigates the role of Roman and late Roman statuary in society. She is the author of the Learned Collector: Mythological Statuettes and Classical Taste in Late Antique Gaul (Ann Arbor 2005) and has published on statuary from France\, Greece\, and Tunisia. Another long-term interest is the archaeology of North Africa\, and for many years she co-directed excavations at the Roman site of Leptiminus (Lamta\, Tunisia). She is the editor (with David Stone) of Mortuary Landscapes of Tunisia (Toronto 2007). \nThis event is possible thanks to the generous financial support of the UW Anonymous Fund. The Center for Visual Cultures would also like to thank The Department of Art History\, The Buildings\, Landscapes\, Cultures Program\, and The Material Culture Program for their support. \n URL:https://arthistory.wisc.edu/event/lea-stirling-traveling-statuettes-and-traveling-aristocrats-networks-of-acquisition-in-the-statuary-collection-at-the-late-antique-villa-of-seviac-france/ LOCATION:Conrad A. Elvehjem Building\, Room L150\, 800 University Avenue\, Madison\, WI\, 53706\, United States CATEGORIES:Public Lecture ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://arthistory.wisc.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/1020/2019/09/c0258f8b-a655-4394-8a87-ea1c044064d2.jpg END:VEVENT BEGIN:VEVENT DTSTART;TZID=America/Chicago:20191106T173000 DTEND;TZID=America/Chicago:20191106T190000 DTSTAMP:20191018T004717 CREATED:20190916T025131Z LAST-MODIFIED:20190916T025131Z UID:1535-1573061400-1573066800@arthistory.wisc.edu SUMMARY:Anna Andrzejewski: "Building Paradise in a Tropical Swamp: Retirement Housing and Communities in South Florida after World War II" DESCRIPTION:This Focus on the Humanities talk explores the intersection of building and development in south Florida and the environmental movement in the second half of the twentieth century. In particular\, it focuses on the Miami-based Deltona Corporation’s efforts to transform Marco Island into a $500 million tropical paradise. Previously a seasonal fishing outpost on Florida’s southern Gulf Coast\, Deltona planned Marco to be a vacation and retirement community focused on a six mile long sandy beach. However much Deltona trilled the island’s “natural charms” to retirees and vacationers nationwide\, Marco had to be radically transformed with canals\, drainage\, and other infrastructure for Deltona’s dream to become a reality. This led to clashes with local residents and environmentalists\, who ultimately thwarted Deltona’s plans to produce a much downscaled community. \nUsing advertisements and Deltona’s private archive\, this lecture showcases a dominant trend in postwar south Florida in which developers simultaneously boasted of the tropical landscape’s natural beauty even as they irrevocably transformed it. In doing so\, it shows how developers attempted to circumvent an increasingly regulatory environment while “building paradise” in the American sunbelt. \n URL:https://arthistory.wisc.edu/event/anna-andrzejewski-building-paradise-in-a-tropical-swamp-retirement-housing-and-communities-in-south-florida-after-world-war-ii/ LOCATION:Conrad A. Elvehjem Building\, Room L140\, 800 University Avenue\, Madison\, WI\, 53706\, United States CATEGORIES:Public Lecture ATTACH;FMTTYPE=image/jpeg:https://arthistory.wisc.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/1020/2019/09/Andrzejewski4.jpeg END:VEVENT END:VCALENDAR